Mosquito Reduction

Public Works receives many calls concerning the West Nile Virus. The following is a link for West Nile from the Centers for Disease Control.  This information is very helpful in understanding the virus and how it propagates: http://www.cdc.gov/westnile/index.html
 

The City of Hendersonville’s Public Works Department started its Mosquito reduction treatments in early March of this year. These treatments include placement of larvicides in permanent pool locations such as sinkholes and spraying neighborhoods that are identified as mosquito problem areas. Treatments normally occur on Friday of every week throughout the spring, summer and fall.

Recent weather conditions, the absence of a cold winter, and the current high water table have combined to produce an exceptionally large number of mosquitoes over the past few weeks. Public Works is continuing direct treatments to problem areas. If you are aware of a specific problem area please contact us at publicworks@hvilletn.org or 822-1016.

Attempting to kill adult mosquitoes is only a temporary and partial solution. Breeding habitats must be eliminated to significantly reduce the mosquito population. Bug Zappers and ultrasonic devices typically do not reduce mosquito populations either. All the mosquito larva needs to develop is an area of standing water for 5 to 7 days. The most common mosquitoes are those called container mosquitoes.  Habitats for container mosquitoes can be found in most yards and around most homes. Container mosquitoes typically travel no more than 100 yards from their original habitat. Below are some effective measures that can help significantly reduce mosquito habitats in your neighborhood.

  1. Remove containers or similar objects such as soda cans, tires, buckets, plastic sheeting, and other similar containers from around home.
  2. Do not allow water to remain standing in flower pot bases or pet dishes for longer than a week.
  3. Clean Gutters, downspouts and roofs to remove leaves and other debris that may hold standing water.
  4. Water in bird baths and children’s wading pools should be changed at least once a week.
  5. Tree holes, stumps or discharge points for air conditioner drains that hold water should be drained or filled with sand or some other solid material.
  6. Water landscape areas so standing water can not accumulate for more than a few days.
  7. Make sure pool or boat covers do not hold water.
  8. Remove, fill or drain any other type of object that may hold water such as a sand box cover or wagon a minimum of once per week.

If you have a location in your yard that is already producing mosquitoes larvicide’s and sprays are available to the public at local stores that can treat small concentrated areas effectively.

Thank you for your help and cooperation. We will all benefit from reduction of the mosquito population and with your help we can make our city a nicer play to live, work and play.
 

Hendersonville Public Works